Easy, Edible Easter-Egg Dye

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Okay, so you might not want to actually EAT this easter-egg dye, but it is natural and non-toxic. And, as you can see from the snapshot above, it is actually effective!

I experimented with homemade Easter-egg dyes for the first time last year after reading this post from Mommypotamus. Having two toddlers who love to put everything in their mouths, it seemed like a no-brainer to give it a go. I was pleasantly surprised by most of the results. When I compared our eggs to my sister-in-law’s eggs, I couldn’t tell the difference between our yellow and pink eggs and the ones she and her kids had made using store-bought dyes. The blue turned out a different hue than theirs, but it was just as deep and striking.

For pink, I simmered a sliced beet in white vinegar. For the life of me, I don’t know how Mommypotamus succeeded in getting such vibrantly colored eggs (click on the link above and take a look at her images)–perhaps my beet was defective? In any case, I tried her method of boiling a sliced beet in water then adding a tablespoon of vinegar before dying, but I could barely decipher the pink. When I boiled the slices in straight vinegar, I secured the result you can see in the photo above. Not stellar, but not bad.

For yellow, I boiled chamomile (two tea bags + a handful of fresh flowers) in water and added one tablespoon of white vinegar before dying. Mommypotamus recommends using turmeric for yellow, which I advise if you have it on hand; I was out of my supply at the time, but knowing how thoroughly turmeric stains my wooden stirring spoon, I have no doubt it would make for very vibrant Easter eggs! I plan to use it this year.

For blue, I simmered a handful of frozen blueberries in straight white vinegar. As with the beets, boiling the blueberries in water and adding vinegar before dying wasn’t as effective (note the paler blue egg to the left of the other blue eggs). Shredded purple cabbage is another option for blue according to Mommypotamus.

For orange, I boiled the petals and anthers of several tiger lilies in water and added one tablespoon of vinegar. Mommypotamus and other sites recommend using yellow onion peels for orange, but I happened to have a bouquet of tiger lilies on hand and they worked well enough.

When my girls are older, I plan to turn our Easter-egg dying into a science lesson on plant pigmentation and the ways in which past generations used plants and other natural materials to make paints and dyes. The Green Education Foundation is a resource you can check out if your children are at an age where they are ready to appreciate such information.

 

Why You Should Filter Your Water

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Those of us who care about our health put a lot of thought into selecting and preparing the foods we eat. But what about our water? We all know that staying well hydrated is essential for optimal health, but do we adequately consider the quality of the water we are ingesting?

If you live in a town or city, you likely consume treated water–which is to say, before your water flows through your pipes and into your glass, it passes through a municipal water treatment plant such as the one described in this PBS article. The article, along with another from Scientific American, broaches the problematic issue of pharmaceuticals ending up in our drinking water–our treated drinking water. The EPA, despite regulating dozens of potential contaminants in our municipal water supplies, does not regulate pharmaceuticals. Limited research has been conducted to determine the level of potential risk posed to human health by traces of antibiotics, antidepressants, birth control pills, and other drugs regularly excreted and/or dumped down the drain by people; however, there is substantial documented evidence of damage to aquatic life, so I operate under the assumption that any amount of pharmaceuticals in my water supply is an inherently bad thing.

Other harmful components present in municipal drinking water are chlorine and, often, fluoride (not all municipalities fluoridate their water, but most in the United States do). But wait, we need fluoride for healthy teeth, right? Wrong. Check out this article published in Wise Tradition, the quarterly journal of the Weston A. Price Foundation; it relates the controversial collusion between industry and academia that resulted in an industrial waste product (fluoride) being used to “enhance” municipal water supplies.

Cox was a major force in giving the Mellons and other industrial giants a way to shift liability from their huge fluoride waste dumps by promoting fluoride as a health benefit. He became a vital cog in the fluoridation machine as one of the first researchers to propose, based on his rat studies, that fluoride prevented cavities and to suggest its addition to public water supplies.

Dr. Gerald Cox was a fellow at the Mellon Institute, which received funding from the same Mellon family that owned Alcoa Aluminum; fluoride, incidentally, is a toxic byproduct of aluminum manufacturing. Enough said.

Chlorine is also problematic. It is used in our water supply because it kills pathogens–but it also kills beneficial microorganisms such as those that reside in our guts and perform key functions to support our immune systems (see my post on Gut Health if you’re new to this topic). When we shower and bathe, we also absorb significant quantities of chlorine through our skin.

So what do we do to protect ourselves from the contaminants in our water? Purchasing a filtration or purification system is essential if you rely on municipal water for your drinking and washing. The Healthy Home Economist gives an excellent overview of the options available to you for removing most of the contaminants. The most effective option is a reverse osmosis system, but for those of us like me who rent their homes or apartments, installing such a system may not be an option. For us, the most effective option is a Berkey water filtration system such as the one pictured above. Berkey’s are pricey, but the filters last for quite some time and are more effective than Brita and Pur filters. I purchased a Berkey because I could still smell chlorine in my water after filtering it with a Brita pitcher, despite the fact that Brita claims to remove chlorine.

As for bathing and showering, bath ball de-chlorinators and shower head de-chlorinators can be purchased from websites such as Radiant Life, where I purchased mine. To save money, you can simply buy a shower head de-chlorinator and fill up your bathtub by running the shower head instead of the faucet, which eliminates the need for a bath ball de-chlorinator (I discovered this trick only after investing in both, but I wouldn’t have purchased the bath ball de-chlorinator if I had thought of this earlier!).

One final note about filtering your drinking water: along with contaminants, you will also end up removing the mineral content, meaning you will need to replace those trace minerals in your diet. My method of doing so is by incorporating Bone Broth into my family’s diet; this is by far the cheapest method. Another method is to purchase mineral drops online or from a health food store; ConcenTrace is a good brand.

I hope I haven’t scared you TOO much with this information–just enough to convince you to protect your health by investing in the best filtration/purification system you can afford!