Relief without Rx

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Most of my few followers have signed up for my blog after reading one of my recipes. Well, what goes in must come out, so today’s post is about the other end of the digestive tract. This may be TMI for some folks, but warm-water enemas have become one of my new favorite home remedies for a variety of symptoms. I’d read about the benefits of enemas before but it wasn’t until my three-year-old daughter swallowed a quarter that I ever performed one, and now I’m a fan.

The situation was this: Libby (a.k.a. the Mangy Munchkin) swallowed a quarter one night while staying at her dad’s house. By the time she came back to me several days later, she still hadn’t pooped it out. A follow-up x-ray revealed that five days after swallowing the offending coin, it was still in her tummy; the x-ray also revealed that her intestines were gummed up with unpassed stool. The pediatrician recommended giving her MiraLAX to loosen her stool and facilitate elimination, but one whiff of the stuff prompted me to call a former-nurse-turned-natural-mama friend for other suggestions (MiraLAX smells like Elmer’s Glue and the primary ingredient–polyethelene glycol or PEG–is also used in industrial manufacturing). My friend recommended administering a warm-water enema and even came over to show me how to do so.

Within minutes, Libby eliminated a significant amount of stool and a day and a half later her quarter passed. Had we gone the MiraLAX route, not only would I have poured more toxins into her system, but it might have taken up to three days to produce an initial bowel movement according to the label on the bottle.

Witnessing how simple, effective, and immediate Libby’s relief was, I’ve since administered several enemas on myself. I’ve done so at times when I’ve felt constipated and/or bloated, and I have likewise experienced quick relief of my symptoms. I also administered one the morning after I spent the day caring for my two-year-old daughter when she had the stomach flu; I woke up the next day feeling queasy and, worried that I might be coming down with the bug myself, performed an enema to rid my system of whatever might be building up inside. I did this twice during the day and never did end up experiencing the symptoms that my daughter had exhibited the day before (projectile vomiting!).

So how does one administer an enema? It’s actually pretty simple and painless. Just warm up about 2 cups of filtered water on the stove (it should be about body temperature), pour it into an enema bag such as the one pictured above, attach the tube, put a dab of coconut or olive oil on the tip, lie down on your back with your knees to your chest, and insert the tip into your rectum; open the clamp on the tube and allow the water to empty into your intestines. As I mentioned above, you will feel an odd pressure as well as the urge to eliminate, but you’ll want to resist doing so until the bag has drained and you’ve rested on the floor for a minute or two. After that, hop onto your toilet for instant relief! The whole process from preparation to elimination to clean up (boil the tip and tube in hot water after using) takes about 10-15 minutes.

The enema bag pictured above is the Jobar International Deluxe Hot Water Bottle Kit (sounds pretty fantastic, doesn’t it?!), which is the one my friend recommended; it sells for about $11 online. You can use it on a regular basis with no side effects. I’ve been using mine an average of once a week, on days when it comes to bedtime and I haven’t yet pooped. Again, this may be TMI, but I tend to poop once a day, which is healthy (twice a day is even healthier) but occasionally I’ll feel pressure in my bowels before bedtime yet be unable to eliminate. I used to think this meant I didn’t have enough stool built up in my system to pass it, but I now know this is, in fact, a mild form of constipation. Allowing stool to sit unpassed for extended periods of time in your bowels results in some of the toxins your body is trying to eliminate being reabsorbed into your system, which is why being “regular” is so important.

Coffee enemas are a powerful mechanism for ridding the body of toxins–so powerful, in fact, that they are sometimes used in cancer therapy. A coffee enema is a different type of enema from a warm-water enema with the more far-reaching aim of ridding the whole body of toxins, not just the intestines. You can read more about them in the linked article. I have not yet performed one of these on myself but intend to once I can find the time (and the coffee).

If you’ve made it to the end of this post, kudos for taking the time to read about this unsavory but salient topic!

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