Oatmeal Cake

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My daughters have been loving this version of oatmeal for breakfast. It would also make for a great snack or homemade granola-bar substitute. I concocted it for the first time a few weeks ago because I was getting bored of the usual oatmeal, and I think the girls were, too. It’s quick and easy to mix up and takes about 25 minutes to bake. Once it’s baked, you’ll have ready-made breakfast bars all week!

Oatmeal Cake

  • 2 cups dry oats, soaked overnight
  • 1 cup baked squash (canned pumpkin would probably work, too)
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/4 cup coconut oil, melted
  • 1/4 cup maple syrup or honey
  • 1/4 cup milk or milk substitute (I use hemp milk)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons almond extract (vanilla extra works as well)
  • 3/4 cup coconut flakes
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 cup raisins or chocolate chips (optional)

Mix all ingredients together, pour into greased 9 x 13 pan, and bake at 350-375 for 25-20 minutes. Allow to cool for 10-15 minutes before serving; if you serve immediately, it won’t keep it’s form–but it’s still yummy!

I like to use baked squash (usually butternut or kabocha) instead of canned because it tastes better to me (canned squash can be more bitter) and because I’m sure it’s more nutritious. I usually bake a squash at some point during the week when I’m around the house doing other things. Simply slice it longways, scoop out the seeds, and place face-down in a baking pan with about a half inch of water and bake at 400-425 for 45-60 minutes (the larger the squash, the longer the baking time). You’ll know it’s done when a fork slides easily through the rind and flesh. After you pull it out of the oven, drain any remaining water and turn the squash face up to allow the steam to evaporate off so it doesn’t end up too watery. If you’re busy like me, you can simply place the halves face down on a plate in the fridge (once they’ve cooled off) until you’re ready to use them; they’ll keep for up to a week.

I soak my oats overnight in water and a teaspoon of cider vinegar to reduce the phytic acid content of the oats as well as to make a moister cake; lemon juice is probably an even better choice than cider vinegar for an acidic medium (it tastes better), I just rarely have it on hand. For at least 30 minutes before mixing up the ingredients, you’ll want to drain the water from the oats in a colander, otherwise the cake will be mushy. If you let the oats strain for longer, that’s fine, too. I’ve forgotten about them on the counter for the better part of a day before getting around to making the cake for the following morning’s breakfast (the cake is excellent right out of the oven, I just don’t usually feel like baking first thing in the morning so I often make it the night before). If you forget to soak the oats overnight (for morning baking) or to set them out in the morning (for late afternoon or evening baking), soaking them for just an hour or two will still help. You can also skip the soaking and just use dry oats, but you’ll probably want to double the milk quantity.

This is a very forgiving recipe. Using a little more or less of any of the above ingredients will not make or break the cake–in fact, I never use measuring implements when I bake, so the given measurements are always approximate. You just want to make sure the consistency of the mixture you put in the pan for baking isn’t too runny (you don’t want it to be as runny as pancake batter, for example) or too sticky (you do want it to be wetter than cookie dough). Even if you do end up with batter that’s runnier or drier than ideal, it will still taste delicious!