Relief without Rx

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Most of my few followers have signed up for my blog after reading one of my recipes. Well, what goes in must come out, so today’s post is about the other end of the digestive tract. This may be TMI for some folks, but warm-water enemas have become one of my new favorite home remedies for a variety of symptoms. I’d read about the benefits of enemas before but it wasn’t until my three-year-old daughter swallowed a quarter that I ever performed one, and now I’m a fan.

The situation was this: Libby (a.k.a. the Mangy Munchkin) swallowed a quarter one night while staying at her dad’s house. By the time she came back to me several days later, she still hadn’t pooped it out. A follow-up x-ray revealed that five days after swallowing the offending coin, it was still in her tummy; the x-ray also revealed that her intestines were gummed up with unpassed stool. The pediatrician recommended giving her MiraLAX to loosen her stool and facilitate elimination, but one whiff of the stuff prompted me to call a former-nurse-turned-natural-mama friend for other suggestions (MiraLAX smells like Elmer’s Glue and the primary ingredient–polyethelene glycol or PEG–is also used in industrial manufacturing). My friend recommended administering a warm-water enema and even came over to show me how to do so.

Within minutes, Libby eliminated a significant amount of stool and a day and a half later her quarter passed. Had we gone the MiraLAX route, not only would I have poured more toxins into her system, but it might have taken up to three days to produce an initial bowel movement according to the label on the bottle.

Witnessing how simple, effective, and immediate Libby’s relief was, I’ve since administered several enemas on myself. I’ve done so at times when I’ve felt constipated and/or bloated, and I have likewise experienced quick relief of my symptoms. I also administered one the morning after I spent the day caring for my two-year-old daughter when she had the stomach flu; I woke up the next day feeling queasy and, worried that I might be coming down with the bug myself, performed an enema to rid my system of whatever might be building up inside. I did this twice during the day and never did end up experiencing the symptoms that my daughter had exhibited the day before (projectile vomiting!).

So how does one administer an enema? It’s actually pretty simple and painless. Just warm up about 2 cups of filtered water on the stove (it should be about body temperature), pour it into an enema bag such as the one pictured above, attach the tube, put a dab of coconut or olive oil on the tip, lie down on your back with your knees to your chest, and insert the tip into your rectum; open the clamp on the tube and allow the water to empty into your intestines. As I mentioned above, you will feel an odd pressure as well as the urge to eliminate, but you’ll want to resist doing so until the bag has drained and you’ve rested on the floor for a minute or two. After that, hop onto your toilet for instant relief! The whole process from preparation to elimination to clean up (boil the tip and tube in hot water after using) takes about 10-15 minutes.

The enema bag pictured above is the Jobar International Deluxe Hot Water Bottle Kit (sounds pretty fantastic, doesn’t it?!), which is the one my friend recommended; it sells for about $11 online. You can use it on a regular basis with no side effects. I’ve been using mine an average of once a week, on days when it comes to bedtime and I haven’t yet pooped. Again, this may be TMI, but I tend to poop once a day, which is healthy (twice a day is even healthier) but occasionally I’ll feel pressure in my bowels before bedtime yet be unable to eliminate. I used to think this meant I didn’t have enough stool built up in my system to pass it, but I now know this is, in fact, a mild form of constipation. Allowing stool to sit unpassed for extended periods of time in your bowels results in some of the toxins your body is trying to eliminate being reabsorbed into your system, which is why being “regular” is so important.

Coffee enemas are a powerful mechanism for ridding the body of toxins–so powerful, in fact, that they are sometimes used in cancer therapy. A coffee enema is a different type of enema from a warm-water enema with the more far-reaching aim of ridding the whole body of toxins, not just the intestines. You can read more about them in the linked article. I have not yet performed one of these on myself but intend to once I can find the time (and the coffee).

If you’ve made it to the end of this post, kudos for taking the time to read about this unsavory but salient topic!

Chocolate-Coconut Gummies

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I’m back! Well, sort of–I’m working a full-time job now, so posts will likely be few and far between, but I hope to continue to blog about my endeavors to remain a healthy, motivated mom despite being back at work and pursuing a doctorate.

The transition to me working again has been the hardest on my oldest daughter (now 3 1/2), who is the more sensitive of my two girls. To let her know I’m thinking about her during the day, I’ve been making a batch of these gummy hearts each week so that I can put one in her lunch every day. They’re super simple, taking about 10 minutes to make, and the ingredients are filling and nutritious.

Ingredients:

4 squares dark chocolate (about half a bar)
1 can full-fat coconut milk
1 T. maple syrup
4 T. grass-fed gelatin
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1 T. chia seeds (optional)

Instructions:

Pour the chia seeds into a small dish along with an equivalent amount of water (this will allow them to gel while you proceed with the rest of the instructions). Melt the chocolate in a saucepan, then add the coconut milk and syrup; warm over low heat. Add the gelatin one tablespoon at a time and stir in thoroughly, then stir in the gelled chia seeds. Remove from heat and stir in the vanilla. Pour into a glass dish, cover, and refrigerate.

I use Great Lakes brand unflavored gelatin, which is sourced from grass-fed animals. Gelatin is essential for joint and tissue health, so it’s not just fun to use but also good for you and your little ones. The coconut milk adds enough fat to make these snacks more filling than their juice-made counterparts, and the chia seeds add a few extra vitamins and minerals (and, purportedly, an energy boost). The maple syrup and vanilla help to bring out the chocolate flavor, which can otherwise be overtaken by the gelatin, which has a slight flavor of its own.

If you’re making these for adults or older children, an entire bar of dark chocolate will taste wonderful; I use half a bar for my girls simply to minimize the amount of caffeine in the treats.

Happy eating!

Why You Should Filter Your Water

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Those of us who care about our health put a lot of thought into selecting and preparing the foods we eat. But what about our water? We all know that staying well hydrated is essential for optimal health, but do we adequately consider the quality of the water we are ingesting?

If you live in a town or city, you likely consume treated water–which is to say, before your water flows through your pipes and into your glass, it passes through a municipal water treatment plant such as the one described in this PBS article. The article, along with another from Scientific American, broaches the problematic issue of pharmaceuticals ending up in our drinking water–our treated drinking water. The EPA, despite regulating dozens of potential contaminants in our municipal water supplies, does not regulate pharmaceuticals. Limited research has been conducted to determine the level of potential risk posed to human health by traces of antibiotics, antidepressants, birth control pills, and other drugs regularly excreted and/or dumped down the drain by people; however, there is substantial documented evidence of damage to aquatic life, so I operate under the assumption that any amount of pharmaceuticals in my water supply is an inherently bad thing.

Other harmful components present in municipal drinking water are chlorine and, often, fluoride (not all municipalities fluoridate their water, but most in the United States do). But wait, we need fluoride for healthy teeth, right? Wrong. Check out this article published in Wise Tradition, the quarterly journal of the Weston A. Price Foundation; it relates the controversial collusion between industry and academia that resulted in an industrial waste product (fluoride) being used to “enhance” municipal water supplies.

Cox was a major force in giving the Mellons and other industrial giants a way to shift liability from their huge fluoride waste dumps by promoting fluoride as a health benefit. He became a vital cog in the fluoridation machine as one of the first researchers to propose, based on his rat studies, that fluoride prevented cavities and to suggest its addition to public water supplies.

Dr. Gerald Cox was a fellow at the Mellon Institute, which received funding from the same Mellon family that owned Alcoa Aluminum; fluoride, incidentally, is a toxic byproduct of aluminum manufacturing. Enough said.

Chlorine is also problematic. It is used in our water supply because it kills pathogens–but it also kills beneficial microorganisms such as those that reside in our guts and perform key functions to support our immune systems (see my post on Gut Health if you’re new to this topic). When we shower and bathe, we also absorb significant quantities of chlorine through our skin.

So what do we do to protect ourselves from the contaminants in our water? Purchasing a filtration or purification system is essential if you rely on municipal water for your drinking and washing. The Healthy Home Economist gives an excellent overview of the options available to you for removing most of the contaminants. The most effective option is a reverse osmosis system, but for those of us like me who rent their homes or apartments, installing such a system may not be an option. For us, the most effective option is a Berkey water filtration system such as the one pictured above. Berkey’s are pricey, but the filters last for quite some time and are more effective than Brita and Pur filters. I purchased a Berkey because I could still smell chlorine in my water after filtering it with a Brita pitcher, despite the fact that Brita claims to remove chlorine.

As for bathing and showering, bath ball de-chlorinators and shower head de-chlorinators can be purchased from websites such as Radiant Life, where I purchased mine. To save money, you can simply buy a shower head de-chlorinator and fill up your bathtub by running the shower head instead of the faucet, which eliminates the need for a bath ball de-chlorinator (I discovered this trick only after investing in both, but I wouldn’t have purchased the bath ball de-chlorinator if I had thought of this earlier!).

One final note about filtering your drinking water: along with contaminants, you will also end up removing the mineral content, meaning you will need to replace those trace minerals in your diet. My method of doing so is by incorporating Bone Broth into my family’s diet; this is by far the cheapest method. Another method is to purchase mineral drops online or from a health food store; ConcenTrace is a good brand.

I hope I haven’t scared you TOO much with this information–just enough to convince you to protect your health by investing in the best filtration/purification system you can afford!

Bone Broth: A Super-Cheap Superfood

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What on earth is that clearish, goopy stuff in my crock pot? Only one of the cheapest, easiest superfoods known to man, of course! Why is it so amazing? What can you use it for? And how do you make it? I’ll answer all of these questions and more in this post.

Like many “new” health fads, bone broth is actually an age-old tradition aimed at extracting as many nutrients as possible from every portion of an animal’s body, allowing nothing to go to waste. It is made by boiling the bones and/or carcass of an animal in an acidic medium for hours or even days at a time. As the bones stew, the minerals, amino acids, and collagen that comprise the bones leach out into the water, creating a nutritious beverage or base for other dishes.

Collagen is essential for healthy bones, tissues, joint, skin, hair, and nails. When cooked, collagen turns into gelatin, which is why the bone broth pictured above looks so jiggly. If your bone broth turns into a bowl of jelly once refrigerated, you know you have a collagen-rich supplement to consume! Note that your broth won’t always turn out this way: it depends on the amount of collagen in the bones you’ve used as well as on the length of time you’ve boiled them. I always source my bones from the same ranch yet sometimes the broth is jiggly and sometimes it’s simply a thick liquid; even as a thick liquid, it contains a beneficial amount of gelatin and other nutrients.

So what can you use this stuff for? Almost anything! I use it instead of water when I boil rice, beans, lentils, or veggies, adding extra nutrition to my dishes. I also use it as a base for soups and as a hot drink when someone isn’t feeling well. When my girls were infants, I used it along with veggies, squash, sweet potatoes, and/or meats to puree homemade baby foods. Now that they’re older, I add several ounces of bone broth to their milk or water as a natural supplement–and they don’t even know it! (Note that this will only work with bone broth made from beef bones–chicken bones lend too strong a flavor to blend with other beverages, at least in my experience).

When you make your own bone broth, you’ll also be able to scrape off the layer of fat that forms on the top once refrigerated. Since only saturated fats are stable at high temperatures, I use this fat to grease my pans when frying eggs, tortillas, or stir-frying meats and veggies; unsaturated fats such as vegetables and olive oils shouldn’t be heated (for more on this topic, see this post and related links from the Healthy Home Economist).

Unless you live in New York City or one of the other metropolitan areas where trendy bone broth shops are popping up (check out NYC’s Brodo Broth Company), you’ll need to make your own broth. Fortunately, doing so is super simple and cheap. The hardest part will likely be sourcing your bones if you’re not already familiar with a place to procure organic, grass-fed animals. If you’re wondering why the way the animal was raised matters, see my post on non-pastured meat and eggs.

I purchase my bones from my local food cooperative for $2.29/lb, meaning I get about 5 quarts of broth for $4-$5. I’ve also found them at health food stores and butcher shops (just make sure to inquire about the way the animals were raised). During hunting season, our local meat market will give away deer and elk bones for free. You’ll want to ask your grocer or butcher for the bones to be cut into sections that will fit into a large pot (ask for cuts that weigh 1-3 pounds). If you have no idea where to find bones for your broth, you can visit eatlocalgrown.com or contact your local chapter of the Weston A. Price Foundation for suggestions.

Once you’ve sourced your bones, you’ll want to place approximately 2 pounds in a 6-quart crock pot (or similar size). For instructions on chicken broth, see my earlier post on utilizing a chicken carcass. For bone broth from beef or game bones, follow the instructions below.

Once the bones are in your slow cooker, add a few tablespoons of vinegar along with enough water to fill the pot within two inches of the top (or whatever your max fill line is). Allow the bones to soak for 30-60 minutes before turning your cooker on low; this will help to maximize the amount of nutrients released from your bones. Once on, leave your cooker on low for 24-48 hours, adding water as needed to keep the pot filled to the max. After 12 hours, you can begin using the broth for cooking or consumption, making sure to replace the amount you consume with an equal amount of fresh water (I try to time my broth-making for days when I’ll be making the dishes mentioned earlier).

During the first few hours, you may need to skim off any scum that forms along the top of the pot (it will be dark and foamy). The bones I use rarely produce much scum, if any; if your bones produce large amounts of scum that you’re constantly having to skim off, consider sourcing your bones from elsewhere.

At the end of your 24-48 hour period, turn off your crock and allow the pot to cool for an hour or two before handling (unless you have a pair of oven mitts with really good grips). Pour the broth through a strainer into another large pot or bowl to remove the bones and any pieces of meat and marrow that have fallen off of them (eat these–just like the broth, they are full of nutrients!). Then store the broth in your refrigerator overnight to allow any fat to rise to the top and solidify.

Once the fat solidifies, skim it off using a slotted spoon to drain off excess liquid (it’s okay if some liquid remains); store it in a container in your fridge for up to a week or in your freezer indefinitely. Pour the broth into glass containers and likewise store it in the fridge for up to a week or in the freezer indefinitely. In my experience, Mason jars are more likely to crack if used for freezing; I’ve found that using glass jelly jars, peanut butter jars, coconut oil jars, etcetera, works better (you could also use plastic jars, but I am wary of the plastics leaching into the broth). In either case, place the jars in the fridge for several hours before moving to the freezer, which will help prevent cracking; when defrosting, do so in the fridge as well rather than on the counter (faster temperature changes are more likely to induce cracking).

With so many uses for bone broth, I almost always use up a full pot of broth within a week. Once you get used to substituting water with broth every chance you get, you likely will do so, too!

Healing Eczema, Asthma, Sleeplessness, and Tantrums Naturally

The mangy munchkin's eczema

It might come as a surprise to you to learn that it is possible to “heal” sleeplessness and tantrums, and as even more of a surprise that it is possible to heal all of the conditions mentioned above simultaneously through dietary changes. But it is!

Let me tell you the story of the mangy munchkin’s legs, pictured above at the beginning of summer 2015. She’d been suffering from persistent eczema for several months and had also started developing symptoms of asthma. Non-steroidal creams wouldn’t clear up the eczema so I took her to a pediatrician for advice. The doctor’s suggestion was to try a name-brand cream and then to try an over-the-counter steroidal cream if one of the non-steroidal creams she recommended didn’t help. Knowing about the connection to gut health and overall health, I asked if a change in diet might make a difference but the pediatrician insisted that food was rarely an issue with eczema except in serious cases (I guess she didn’t think Libby’s case was serious).

None of the non-steroidal creams she recommended worked. Not wanting to use steroids on the mangy munchkin’s delicate skin, I took her to a naturopathic doctor for alternative advice. The naturopath immediately concurred that food was likely an issue, so she ordered a food sensitivity test that examined antigens in her blood to determine whether certain foods may have been causing an autoimmune reaction in her body, resulting in the eczema. Sure enough, a handful of foods that she ate commonly (including eggs, dairy, coconut, and beans) registered on the test. After eliminating these foods from her diet for a month and applying a bit of Neosporin to the last remaining spot of eczema on her left leg (which had become infected from scratching), her eczema cleared up completely–and along with it, her systems of asthma disappeared.

Just one month of eliminating certain foods from her diet healed her eczema, whereas nearly three months of trying various creams did not. While the steroidal cream may have cleared up the eczema (we’ll never know since we never tried it), her rash surely would have returned given that all of the foods she was sensitive to would have still been in her diet had I followed the first pediatrician’s advice. Had I not turned to her diet to heal her, we would have been dealing with bouts of eczema indefinitely, and very likely with a worsening of her asthma.

What’s more, her nighttime awakenings and fits as well as her daytime tantrums subsided, something that I didn’t even think to associate with her diet at the time. I only recently realized that her food sensitivity issues were connected to her sleep issues as well when she experienced a resurgence of her eczema this week after she ate handfuls of cashews one afternoon. She’d never had them before so we didn’t realize she was sensitive to them, and along with the rash came several nights of midnight awakenings and several days of crankiness and bad behavior, which is just now subsiding as her rash has disappeared.

Dr. David Perlmutter and Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride both share countless stories of behavior and sleep improvements promulgated by dietary changes in their books on gut health. If you have a toddler who has trouble sleeping and/or throws lots of tantrums (or is depressed), don’t assume it’s the terrible twos or threes–it could be a food sensitivity (or sensitivities, as in the mangy munchkin’s case). Any child or adult, for that matter, who exhibits anxious or moody behavior could be suffering from a damaged gut, which is connected to the brain through the vagus nerve and has been proven by scientific studies to influence not just our digestive tract but also our minds.

What if you can’t afford a naturopath or there simply isn’t one in your area? The GAPS diet is an approach developed by Dr. Campbell-McBride that offers a more-or-less surefire way of healing the gut even if you don’t know what your or your child’s food sensitivities are. It requires a drastic alteration in diet, eliminating most foods besides meat, vegetables, and broth for several weeks to several months depending on how serious a person’s symptoms are (and thus how seriously their gut is damaged). If that seems difficult to swallow, think of it this way: meal planning becomes super easy since there’s only so much you can eat! The website linked above provides a wealth of resources for those considering the diet, including recipes.

The good news about a natural approach to healing is that once a child is off of the foods to which they are sensitive for a period of time, giving their digestive and immune systems a chance to heal, those foods can be reintroduced and enjoyed once again down the road; how much further down the road depends on how quickly they heal. It only took a month of eliminating the foods to which the mangy munchkin was sensitive before her symptoms cleared up and she was once again able to eat butter, coconut, gluten, and other foods she had previously been sensitive to, only now without any side effects.

I urge anyone with children—indeed, anyone at all—to take seriously the connection between food and health. Modern medicine and the media would have you believe that the only thing food affects is our weight, but in reality it affects so much more. Anthelme Brillat-Savarin had it right when he coined the phrase “you are what you eat.” If you eat crap, that’s what you’ll feel like. If you eat well, you’ll nourish your body into performing at its absolute best.

The Mangy Munchkin’s Meal Plan

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After my last post on the evils of sugar, I received a request to write a post about what I feed my kids. If we don’t eat breakfast cereals, processed foods, desserts, or drink juice, what do we eat? It might seem that there’s not much left to please children if you cut out everything with sugar and refined carbohydrates, but as you can tell from the photo above, there are still plenty of delicious foods left to keep our little ones happy.

In this post, I’ll give a basic run down of the current menu in our household (it varies from time to time as I discover new foods and recipes) and then share some ideas for snacks to keep your kiddos satisfied in between meals and on the go. If I’ve already posted a recipe that I mention, it’ll be linked to the appropriate post; if I haven’t yet posted a recipe, I’ll try my best to get to it soon so that you can start trying out some of my ideas in your own home!

Breakfast is a big deal in our household. It competes with dinner for the largest meal of the day and is always hot except for a side of sauerkraut. Most mornings my youngest and I eat eggs from our free-range hens while the mangy munchkin, who has an egg sensitivity, eats sausage from one of the farms and ranches in our area (for more on why I’m careful about the meat I select, read my post on pastured meat and eggs). All of us eat a side of homemade sauerkraut with our meal to aid with digestion and to provide a healthy dose of probiotics. Occasionally we’ll enjoy a bowl of soaked oatmeal for breakfast instead of (or in addition to) our eggs and sausage. Oatmeal is absolutely delicious with a dash of cinnamon and a tablespoonful of virgin coconut oil, which enhances flavor, satiation, and nutrient absorption. Instead of fruit juice, which has as much sugar as soda, we sip water kefir with our meal.

If we don’t eat oatmeal with breakfast, we often eat oatmeal cake for lunch along with chocolate brain pudding and frozen banana ice cream. When I make chocolate brain pudding for my girls, I just use a few squares of chocolate since I don’t want to expose them to too much caffeine. Another common lunch we enjoy is homemade sourdough rolls smothered with butter (we prefer Kerry Gold) and a side of milk kefir, which I make nice and thick so that it has a consistency somewhere between yoghurt and cottage cheese. Believe it or not, my girls LOVE this super tart, probiotic treat and always ask for seconds.

Dinner typically involves some sort of meat or poultry and as many veggies as I can muster. If I make slow-cooker chicken I dump in kale, beets, beet greens, broccoli, zucchini, onions, garlic–whatever looks fresh and good at the grocery store (although we usually buy the broccoli frozen). If I brown ground beef, I do it in a large cast-iron pot with a lid so that I can add chopped mushrooms, eggplant, and onions to cook along with the meat for a healthy hash. Baked sweet potatoes or squash mashed with butter and cinnamon are a common side with any dinner, and “dessert” is often one or two pieces of crystalized ginger, which doubles as a digestive aid.

So what about snacks? Since I make most of my meals from scratch, I want snacks to be easy. Here are some things I keep on hand for simple, healthy snacking:

  • Cheese
  • Olives
  • Avocados
  • Carrots
  • Celery
  • Raisins
  • Apples
  • Dried coconut
  • Frozen blueberries
  • Frozen peas (boil a handful at a time–takes two minutes!)
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Popcorn (tastes great drizzled with virgin olive oil and sea salt)
  • Organic, nitrate-free jerky (we make our own but buy it at our health-food store when we run out)
  • Dehydrated veggie snacks (also purchased at our health food store)

If your kids are used to a more sugary, starchy diet, switching them over to the kinds of meals and snacks mentioned in this post might be challenging at first, but it is definitely possible (see my last post for tips on transitioning your children away from refined carbs and sugar). Your reward for sticking it out will be cheerful, healthy children who won’t require a trip to the doctor’s office every month!

Oh, and a note about olives: if your kids refuse to eat them at first, show them how to pop them on their fingertips and see if they don’t eat them up once they realize what a fun “finger” food they are!

The Truth About Sugar

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Above is a photo of the mangy munchkin reveling at her first Halloween in costume. Just over 1 1/2, she spent most of the evening in a daze, looking somewhat confused whenever someone placed a treat in her little basket. A year later, when I searched for that same basket to use again this Halloween, I found it in the pantry–still full of the candy I wouldn’t allow her to eat.

Every year at this time millions of parents face the dilemma of what to do with bagfuls of candy that we really don’t want our children to eat but that we feel strangely obligated to allow. After all, we don’t want to let it go to waste. And we don’t want to be the mean parents who keep our kids from enjoying Halloween.

Or do we? I, for one, have no trouble dumping whole baskets of candy in the trash can (it’s garbage anyway) or saying NO to gorging on sweets on Halloween night. I’ve never been one to bend to peer pressure, and when my children’s health is at stake, my resolve is even stronger. I’m known (probably not very affectionately) as the food nazi in my family, monitoring every bite of food that goes into my girls’ mouths. I’ve even leapt across rooms to defend my children from spoonfuls of sugary sweetness that I don’t want them exposed to, and I can only hope that some day my relatives come to respect my concern over the large amounts of sugar customary in our society.

You see, it’s not just a temporary sugar high that impacts our children (or ourselves) when we eat too many sweets. Eating sugar–especially refined sugar–alters our microbiomes in a way that leads to damaging inflammation in our bodies, which in turn makes us susceptible to autoimmune conditions such as autism, ADHD, asthma, eczema, diabetes, heart disease, and even Alzheimers, not to mention everyday illnesses such as the common cold. Having an imbalanced microbiome can even impact our moods, making us more irritable, anxious, and/or depressed. I don’t think it’s a coincidence that when we altered the mangy munchkin’s diet in order to clear up her asthma and eczema, her temper tantrums also abated. Terrible twos? Maybe it’s just too much sugar (and refined carbohydrates in general).

So what constitutes “too much” when it comes to sweets? I once read that the human body has not evolved to handle much more sugar than is contained in a single orange–about 35 grams per day (I unfortunately can’t remember where I read this information, but rest assured that I wouldn’t have committed it to memory had I not trusted the source). I was shocked when I first read this because at the time I consumed far more sugar than that even though I ate far less sugar than most of the people around me. I still consume more than 35 grams of sugar on most days, but I try to keep my “overdosing” to a minimum.

With time, I’ve slowly whittled away at the primary sources of sugar in our diet. We don’t eat desserts after meals (my girls don’t even know that word) and we snack on more veggies than fruits (although I do allow up to two servings of fruit each day). We don’t eat breakfast cereals, nearly all of which have some amount of added sugar; in fact, we don’t eat processed foods at all since a majority of them contain high-fructose corn syrup–even foods that aren’t generally thought of as sweet such as ketchup. We don’t drink fruit juice but instead sip on water kefir, whole milk, and just plain water.

As I’ve eliminated sources of sugar, I’ve found that I’ve simultaneously lost my desire for sweets, making it surprisingly easy for me to resist cakes, cookies, and candies, even when they are the centerpiece at a party. Instead, I crave fats, proteins, and whole grains: lightly salted fried eggs, buttered whole-wheat sourdough bread, oatmeal cut with coconut oil and heavy cream. Yum! I do allow myself a serving of dark chocolate every day, but I don’t consider it candy–it’s brain food.

If you think you or your kids could NEVER stop craving sugar, consider this: the microbes in your gut actually send signals to your brain to feed them the kind of foods they crave, so when you start starving the bad bugs (the ones who crave sugar and refined carbs), they will begin to die off and you, too, will stop craving sugar. In fact, “die-off” is a term that refers to the process your body may go through as your microbiome rebalances itself, during which time you may experience headaches, diarrhea (or constipation), or other unpleasant flu-like symptoms as your body expels the unwanted microbes (you can read more about die-off here). This short article by Dr. Raphael Kellmen explains how rapidly our microbiome can adjust to dietary changes–literally overnight!

As adults, we can likely muster the fortitude necessary to do what we know is good for us–but what about our kids? How do I get a one-year-old and a two-year-old to eat well? It’s actually surprisingly simple: you say no to the bad stuff (refined sugars and carbs, processed foods, and vegetable oils) and provide them with the good stuff (whole grains, healthy fats and proteins, and plenty of fresh veggies and fruits–just don’t overdo it on the fruit). It may take a few days for your children to accept your “no” and begin to eat the healthier foods you offer them, especially if they’ve become accustomed to a particular diet, but they WILL learn. We had to go through several days of the mangy munchkin barely consuming a bite of food when we transitioned her away from the snacks that daddy had been sharing with her (chips and candy) and back to eating solely healthy foods, but she eventually learned that no means no and if she wanted to satiate her hunger, she’d better eat what was offered.

Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride, in her book Gut and Psychology Syndrome, describes an approach based on Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) for getting children to change their diets. She suggests presenting a small bite of a child’s favorite food, set off to the side, and only allowing it to be eaten once a bite of a healthier food is eaten first. If the child refuses, allow him or her to do so and don’t try to stop any kicking or screaming. Simply restate your conditions and give the child time to decide that they are willing to eat the healthier food in exchange for a bite of their desired food. The next day, mandate two bites of the healthier food before the desired food is allowed. Continue increasing the number of bites of the healthy food required to obtain a bite of the unhealthy food until the child will contentedly eat a full meal of healthy, nutritious food–and then stop offering the unhealthy food altogether. Persistence is crucial because if you break your resolve just once, you will prolong the battle indefinitely. Your child needs to know that you will not cave when they throw a tantrum or use whatever tactic they are prone to use to get their way. Due to the rapid changes that occur in our microbiome when we alter our diets, it shouldn’t take long for children to begin appreciating and even craving the healthier foods. My girls absolutely love sauerkraut, milk kefir, and real sourdough bread, foods that most people consider far too sour and tart to consume, and I believe it’s because their microbiomes have come to crave these rich sources of probiotics.

I suppose some moms might call me mean for not allowing my children to eat sweets devoid of other nutrients (we do eat fruit and coconut puddings sweetened with a tad of honey), but I don’t have a problem saying no when the mangy munchkin asks to have a piece of cake or a cookie at a party, or when the nurse offers her a lollipop after a doctor’s appointment (I bring a small box of raisins instead). I’ll jealously guard the health of my children’s microbiome for as long as I can do so because you become what you eat, and I want my girls to become healthy women whose microbes send them signals to choose nutritious foods. I’ll still allow them to go trick-or-treating tonight, but that bag of candy they come home with will go straight in the garbage–where it belongs.