Chocolate-Coconut Gummies

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I’m back! Well, sort of–I’m working a full-time job now, so posts will likely be few and far between, but I hope to continue to blog about my endeavors to remain a healthy, motivated mom despite being back at work and pursuing a doctorate.

The transition to me working again has been the hardest on my oldest daughter (now 3 1/2), who is the more sensitive of my two girls. To let her know I’m thinking about her during the day, I’ve been making a batch of these gummy hearts each week so that I can put one in her lunch every day. They’re super simple, taking about 10 minutes to make, and the ingredients are filling and nutritious.

Ingredients:

4 squares dark chocolate (about half a bar)
1 can full-fat coconut milk
1 T. maple syrup
4 T. grass-fed gelatin
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1 T. chia seeds (optional)

Instructions:

Pour the chia seeds into a small dish along with an equivalent amount of water (this will allow them to gel while you proceed with the rest of the instructions). Melt the chocolate in a saucepan, then add the coconut milk and syrup; warm over low heat. Add the gelatin one tablespoon at a time and stir in thoroughly, then stir in the gelled chia seeds. Remove from heat and stir in the vanilla. Pour into a glass dish, cover, and refrigerate.

I use Great Lakes brand unflavored gelatin, which is sourced from grass-fed animals. Gelatin is essential for joint and tissue health, so it’s not just fun to use but also good for you and your little ones. The coconut milk adds enough fat to make these snacks more filling than their juice-made counterparts, and the chia seeds add a few extra vitamins and minerals (and, purportedly, an energy boost). The maple syrup and vanilla help to bring out the chocolate flavor, which can otherwise be overtaken by the gelatin, which has a slight flavor of its own.

If you’re making these for adults or older children, an entire bar of dark chocolate will taste wonderful; I use half a bar for my girls simply to minimize the amount of caffeine in the treats.

Happy eating!

Chocolate Brain Pudding

Brain pudding ingredients

I just came across the most wonderful news last night as I was reading through the eighth chapter of Brain Maker: The Power of Gut Microbes to Heal and Protect Your Brain–for Life by David Perlmutter, MD. The chapter on “Feeding Your Microbiome” lists dark chocolate–along with coffee, tea, and wine–as Key #3 to maintaining a healthy microbiome based on the latest science.

Researchers have long found that flavonoids, compounds prevalent in the plants used to produce these products, provide numerous health benefits for those who consume them (in moderation, of course). What scientists are now finding is that flavonoids also feed the friendly bacteria in our guts, which may in fact account for the other benefits associated with these compounds such as reducing oxidative stress and inflammation, which in turn reduces risk for cardiovascular and other diseases.

Reading this fantastic information reminded me that it had been awhile since I’d made one of my favorite snacks, which I’m now deeming Brain Pudding. The ingredients are shown in the photo above. Full-fat coconut milk serves as the base for the pudding along with a tablespoon of honey, a dash of vanilla extract, a few pinches of cinnamon, and 4-8 squares of melted dark chocolate (how many you use will depend on the size of the squares and how chocolaty you want your pudding). Coconut fat contains brain-boosting beta-HBA while the flavonoids in the dark chocolate feed friendly gut bacteria–and as Dr. Perlmutter’s book reveals, what is good for the gut is good for the brain.

To make brain pudding, simply add all of the above ingredients plus 1/4 cup of milk (we use hemp milk since the mangy munchkin can’t drink cow’s milk) to a small blender or food processor (I use my Magic Bullet) and whip until smooth. I melt my chocolate in a small saucepan on the stove over low heat (the lowest level possible–otherwise it burns) and scrape it into the blender with a spatula. Once the ingredients are blended, pour them into a pint-sized glass jar or container and refrigerate for a few hours to thicken. If you don’t mind the consistency of tapioca, you can also stir in a handful of chia seeds after the pudding has been blended for added nutrition.

Although I haven’t tried it myself since I’m currently a stay-at-home mom, I bet you can make a great to-go pudding snack out of this recipe if you have single-serving containers to pour the pudding into. You’d need to keep an ice pack with your pudding so it doesn’t liquify before you get a chance to eat it, or if you have access to a fridge at work you could store it there (it won’t soften much in the time it takes to get from home to work, and even if it does, it will re-solidify in the fridge).

Chocolate brain pudding is an easy, satisfying, delectable, healthy snack or dessert that you can actually feel good about eating. Isn’t that some of the best news of your day, too?!